PRINCE WILLIAM LEARNS THE ART OF THE PHOTOCALL FROM PRINCESS DIANA

William is king of the photocall… by learning from Diana’s mistakes, says  former media adviser to Princess of Wales

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It is a key moment in our changing Monarchy,  perhaps a defining one.

The world was watching when Prince William  presented his wife and newborn son to a wall of microphones and lenses – and he  responded with aplomb.

There were smiles, there was diffidence, even  jokes, including that self-deprecating reference to his thinning  hair.

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Comfortable: Prince William's jokey demaeanour with the press was a winner outside the Lindo Wing on tuesday evening as he and the Duchess of Cambridge introduced their son to the world

Comfortable: Prince William’s jokey demaeanour with the  press was a winner outside the Lindo Wing on tuesday evening as he and the  Duchess of Cambridge introduced their son to the world

 

 
Prince William cradles Prince George
Princess Diana
 

Lessons: Prince William, left, has learned lessons from  his late mother Princess Diana’s (right) handling of the media

 
Well brought up: Prince William, pictured with his mother as a baby, owes Princess Diana a debt of gratitude says Jane Atkinson

Well brought up: Prince William, pictured with his  mother as a baby, owes Princess Diana a debt of gratitude says Jane  Atkinson

By the time he had strapped Prince George  Alexander Louis into a Range Rover and departed in a lightning storm of flash  bulbs, Prince William had delivered the sort of rounded performance that many  film stars might struggle to achieve.

The lack of formality was striking. Prince  Charles, on the same steps at St Mary’s some 30 years before, addressed the  nation in a suit and tie, looking rather like a prep school housemaster. 

In contrast, last week we saw a relaxed young  man in jeans and an open-necked shirt (with the sleeves rolled up) – the  everyday clothes of his countrymen.  

Kate and William bring out baby George for first  time
 

 
 

 

The effect was completed when the Duke of  Cambridge strapped Prince George into the Range Rover, and took the wheel  himself.

A true Boden Dad at work.

Some have described it as a public relations  exercise, but I don’t think it was. William does not have to handle the  media.

He just handles himself. And in this he owes  a special debt to Diana, from whom he has clearly learnt a great  deal.

 
Fatherly: Prince William was seen to strap his son into the Range Rover outside the hospital on Tuesday

Fatherly: Prince William was seen to strap his son into  the Range Rover outside the hospital on Tuesday

I was employed as media adviser to his  mother, and saw both her strengths and weaknesses in public presentation. 

Like Diana, William is confident and  selfassured, dignified without being stuffy, funny without being forced, and  obviously very happy at this moment in his life.

He is the first member of the Royal Family to  look comfortable in denim.

It shouldn’t be forgotten that Kate, too, is  highly skilled. She does not play up to the media – no artful glances to attract  the camera, no dressing to steal attention.

Kate recognises that she has a job to do. She  does it well. So what if she had makeup on and her hair blow-dried – wouldn’t  you?

 
Hands on: Some dismissed Prince William driving his family home from hospital as a publicity stunt, but Jane Atkinson believes it was genuine

Hands on: Some dismissed Prince William driving his  family home from hospital as a publicity stunt, but Jane Atkinson believes it  was genuine

It is this determination to be natural that  has helped turn William and Kate into global superstars, and has done much to  secure fresh popularity for the Monarchy in a modern age.

In global recognition, William is a match for  Tom Cruise or George Clooney.

His mother created the role – William and his  brother Harry have built on it.

Diana ensured her children were aware of the  power of the media in shaping public perception.

And like Diana, William is in charge. I have  no doubt his advisers told him what was going on outside the  hospital.

Fight: Princess Diana was wrong to think she could control the media says Jane Atkinson

Fight: Princess Diana was wrong to think she could  control the media says Jane Atkinson

They would also have talked through the  options – from disappearing through the back door to the assured appearance they  eventually gave. It was a recognition that their son is a public figure forever. 

If they try to hide themselves away they will  be chased and their motives will be misconstrued.

William has learned from Diana’s mistakes,  too. Diana had to fight for her right to control her image and to create a media  relationship she could manage.

Sometimes she did it well; mostly she  manipulated it too far.

She learnt that you can’t be open one minute  and expect to be able to withdraw the next.

She created an out-of-control media circus,  particularly towards the end of her life, which she fooled herself into thinking  she controlled.

It would have been fascinating to see how she  coped with the proliferation of online media which is so difficult to control in  any way.

Through the tragedy of his mother’s death,  William has created a media relationship on his own terms and in a modern way. 

He actually speaks to the media – not through  formal speeches and set-pieces.

He answers questions and is very  open.

Diana and Charles gave speeches and  constructed interviews, but they were never encouraged to speak openly. They  both made disastrous attempts at this when they were separated, but even these  appearances were scripted.

They spoke to the media through spokesmen,  friends and advisers.

In return for the Cambridges’ generosity and  recognition of the terms in which they do their jobs and make their appearances,  the media is generous in return.

William and Kate have forged a flattering  public image because it is authentic.

They have learnt, as Kipling put it, ‘to walk  with Kings nor lose the common touch.’

 
Learning: Through his mother's death, Prince William (second left) has created a relationship with the media on his own terms

Learning: Through his mother’s death, Prince William  (second left) has created a relationship with the media

 

Diana’s White Knee Highs, but the polka dot dress lives on!

DIANA STYLE KATE BIRTH

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have appeared on the steps of the Lindo Wing at St Mary’s Hospital presenting their new royal baby boy. And we think It was a beautifully touching tribute to Prince William’s late mother Princess Diana, that Kate opted for a blue polka dot dress in spectacularly similar style to Princess Diana’s own hospital steps outfit in 1982.

If we look back to around this time 31 years ago, Princess Diana and Prince Charles were emerging on the same hospital steps with their new baby, Prince William. For her first appearance post-birth, Princess Diana opted for a very similar, if slightly larger (and much more 80s), billowing, turquoise polka dot dress, almost resembling a nightie. And we don’t blame her! Labour is no easy feat, we’d want to be comfortable, too…

The Duchess’ own dress was designed by Jenny Packham, one of her favourite labels and was much more modern in shape. The sky blue dress was nipped in at the waist, fell just above Kate’s knees, and while she may have been missing those white stockings – the ensemble certainly referenced Princess Diana’s own ‘going home’ style.

The world has been gearing up to the appearance all day after Kate’s hairdresser was photographed entering the hospital to prepare the Duchess for her first public appearance post-birth. And photographers weren’t disappointed as the young couple posed for pictures holding their new bundle of joy – and future king – for the world to see.

Vintage Diana’s Diary with Pages for Baby!

Vintage Diana's Diary with Pages for Baby!

http://www.princessdianabookboutique.com/store/products/details/?product=35

A UNIQUE 1981 PUBLICATION DETAILING DIANA’S FIRST YEAR FROM JANUARY 1981 TO ABOUT JANUARY 1982. PHOTOS ARE IN A CALENDAR STYLE FORMAT OF STARTING WITH THE ENGAGEMENT THROUGH THE WEDDING AND ANNOUNCEMENT OF EXPECTING WILLIAM. SMALL COLOR AND BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOS THROUGHOUT. PAGES BLANK AT END FOR SCRAPBOOK TYPE PHOTOS FOR WILLIAM PHOTOS.

PRINCE GEORGE ALEXANDER LOUIS OF CAMBRIDGE!!

Prince George of Cambridge! Kate and William proudly announce the name of their baby two days after his birth

  • Kensington Palace  revealed the baby’s full name will be Prince George  Alexander Louis of Cambridge
  • Her Majesty wanted to see the Duke, Duchess and Baby Cambridge before she goes on holiday this  Friday
  • Kate, Prince  William and their newborn baby travelled home to Kensington Palace yesterday  evening
  • Couple say they  are ‘still working on a name’ but James and George are the bookies’  favourites
  • William jokes his  new son ‘has a good pair of lungs’ and tells crowd his child has Kate’s looks  and more hair than him 
  • Kate’s parents  Carole and Michael were the first members of the family to visit their daughter  and her young son 

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have this  evening revealed that their son – now the third in line to the throne –   will be called George.

Kensington Palace revealed the baby’s full  name will be Prince George Alexander  Louis of Cambridge. The name emerged after baby Cambridge was taken to see his grandparents on  his first afternoon out as it was revealed the Queen and Prince Harry have now  met the royal baby for the first time.

Kate and William smiled broadly and waved  from their car as they were driven away from Kensington Palace by security,  where they had spent their first night together as a family.

Both the Duke and Duchess looked happy and  fresh-faced, with William sat in the front passenger seat and Kate in the back  with their child in his baby seat.

New life: The baby was crying in his car seat as his father took him to their waiting car yesterday eveningNew life: Kensington Palace revealed the baby’s full  name will be George Alexander Louis

They left their west London home shortly after the Queen had visited her new great-grandson and potentially  discussed  names with the parents, as the guessing  game over what he will be called continues.

Kensington Palace officials would not confirm  where the young family were going this afternoon, but their black Land Rover was  later seen arriving at grandparents Carole and Michael Middleton’s mansion in  Bucklebury, Berkshire.

Her Majesty, who will travel to Balmoral for  her summer holiday on Friday, spent 30 minutes with the Duke, Duchess and Baby  Cambridge from 11am.

It has also emerged that Prince Harry, who is  said to be thrilled to have become an uncle, may have been there last night  after the trio left hospital, having raced back to London from Wattisham airbase  in Suffolk where he is on duty with the  RAF.

It is understood that James Middleton and  Pippa Middleton were also at Kensington Palace yesterday evening.

Prince Philip has yet to meet the child, but  he and his wife will be heading to Balmoral on Friday and it is understood that  Kate and William may take the new prince there for a long weekend this  summer.

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First day at home: Kate, William and their baby left Kensington Palace today as they were seen for the first time since leaving hospital last night First day at home: Kate, William and their baby left  Kensington Palace today as they were seen for the first time since leaving  hospital last night

Very happy: Kate and William both smiled and waved to crowds outside the gates, but Kensington Palace would not reveal where they were headingVery happy: Kate and William both smiled and waved to  crowds outside the gates, but Kensington Palace would not reveal where they were  heading

Prince William and his wife Catherine
A grinning Kate by the baby seat

Relaxed: William looked fresh and was wearing glasses  while Kate chatted to their newborn and grinned to people watching as she sat  next to their prince’s baby seat

New mother: Kate waved with her left hand and appeared to have her right hand resting next to her baby New mother: Kate waved with her left hand and appeared  to have her right hand resting next to her baby

Visit to the in-laws: The couple arrived in Bucklebury this afternoon to stay with the MiddletonsVisit to the in-laws: The couple arrived in Bucklebury  this afternoon to stay with the Middletons

Ancestral home: The house where Kate's parents live has received additional security to prepare for the royal couple's visitAncestral home: The house where Kate’s parents live has  received additional security to prepare for the royal couple’s visit

Back again: The new parents spent a week in Bucklebury recently, shortly before Kate returned to London in order to give birthBack again: The new parents spent a week in Bucklebury  recently, shortly before Kate returned to London in order to give  birth

Their were clear hints that Kate and William  were off to Bucklebury after heightened police presence was in evidence around  the £5million home of the Duchess of Cambridge’s parents this morning. 

Yellow police cones with a ‘no waiting’  symbols lined both sides of the road every few yards for around a mile either  side of majestic Bucklebury Manor, West Berkshire.

A bright yellow sign stuck to a road sign  confirmed an ’emergency’ three-week bylaw prohibited any form of waiting in the  road while a pair of police officers stood at both entrances to the Grade II  listed Georgian pile, while marked police cars swept past the entrances every  couple of minutes.

A large police horsebox marked ‘Mounted  section’ arrived in the picturesque village at lunchtime and a small marquee  surrounded by marked and unmarked police cars was visible in a nearby field. 

It was not possible to tell whether the  Duchess’ parents or her siblings, Pippa and James, were at the vast estate, set  in 18 acres of land and boasting its own tennis court, swimming pool and  library.

Last night The Queen told guests at a Buckingham Palace reception she was ‘thrilled’ at the birth of  her great-grandson, and today William and Kate may have discussed potential  names with her.

 

William and Kate take their baby on his first  outing

On the eve of the baby’s birth, the Queen  famously told a ten-year-old schoolgirl that she didn’t mind if it was a boy or  a girl, adding: ‘I would very much like it to arrive. I’m going on  holiday’.

Dressed in a turquoise floral outfit she  looked relaxed and happy as she left, having travelled the short distance from  Buckingham Palace without the Duke of Edinburgh, who is still convalescing at  Windsor Castle following exploratory abdominal surgery last month.

Baby Cambridge has spent his first night at  homeafter  a dramatic evening where the waiting world had its first wonderful glimpse of  him.

Heading home: After half an hour with the new prince, Kate and William, where they may have discussed names, the Queen went back to Buckingham Palace Heading home: After half an hour with the new prince,  Kate and William, where they may have discussed names, the Queen went back to  Buckingham Palace

Down the drive: Her Majesty visited without the Duke of Edinburgh, who is still at Windsor Castle recuperating after an operation last monthDown the drive: Her Majesty visited without the Duke of  Edinburgh, who is still at Windsor Castle recuperating after an operation last  month

Happy day: The Queen arrives at Kensington Palace today to meet her new great-grandson for the first time and see his parentsHappy day: The Queen arrives at Kensington Palace today  to meet her new great-grandson for the first time and see his parents

Her Majesty looked expectant
She then looked out at the palace grounds as she passed photographers

Happy to be there: The Queen looked expectantly  towards  the palace as she arrived and she will be pleased to see the  baby before she  goes on holiday on Friday

Prince William said yesterday they were  ‘still working on a name’ for the future king, reportedly because he and Kate wanted to see their baby’s ‘little face’  and get to know him before choosing one.

After he left hospital at around 7pm his aunt  Pippa and brother James were waiting for him at Kensington  Palace for a cuddle as the little boy is introduced to his family..

The Cambridges were safely tucked away in a  small cottage in Kensington Palace’s grounds today, with the only sign of  movement this morning being a royal protection officer walking their dog Ludo nearby.

Queen Elizabeth II meets her great-grandson and heir!

Her crowning moment: Her beaming smile last night said it all. The Queen has secured her dynasty with THREE heirs to see the monarchy through to the next century

By  A. N. Wilson

To become a grandparent is an awe-inspiring  experience. It gives you the feeling of a future being guaranteed. I should  know: I have six grandchildren, and I am only 62! Someone who is a grandparent  can say to themselves: ‘I shall die — as shall we all — but I have handed on the  baton. The story goes on.’

How much more must this be the case with the  birth of a great-grandchild. And with a royal great-grandchild, the feelings are  shared by everyone who has an interest in the future of the Monarchy and of our  country.

The great-grandmother in this story has not  been a passive observer. Now the Duchess of Cambridge has had her son, the Queen  will know that she has secured her dynasty, and the Monarchy, up to three  generations into the future — perhaps into the 22nd century.

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The Queen will know that she has secured her dynasty. This is not something purely accidental. It is something in which, discreetly, she has been more involved than many people would thinkThe Queen will know that she has secured her dynasty.  This is not something purely accidental. It is something in which, discreetly,  she has been more involved than many people would think

To become a grandparent is an awe-inspiring experience. It gives you the feeling of a future being guaranteed. How much more must this be the case with the birth of a great-grandchild, and a royal one at thatTo become a grandparent is an awe-inspiring experience.  It gives you the feeling of a future being guaranteed. How much more must this  be the case with the birth of a great-grandchild, and a royal one at  that

Now the Duchess of Cambridge has had her son, the Queen will know that she has secured the Monarchy up to three generations into the future - perhaps into the 22nd centuryNow the Duchess of Cambridge has had her son, the Queen  will know that she has secured the Monarchy up to three generations into the  future – perhaps into the 22nd century

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This is not something purely accidental. It  was not bound to happen. It is something in which, discreetly, the Queen has  been more involved than many people would think.

Only a few decades ago in Britain, the public  was in republican mood. The Press could be blamed for some of the bad taste with  which it reported stories, but it could not be blamed for the stories themselves  — of royal marriages breaking up at the rate of plates in a Greek restaurant,  amid a political climate in which the very idea of monarchy was looking  questionable.

The Queen is the person who has steered the  Monarchy out of the troubled waters. She has been able to do so in part because  she obviously gets on so well with Prince William, her grandchild, with whom —  since the death of his mother — she has had a particularly warm  relationship.

In unsuccessful institutions, whether a  family, a company, a church or even a royal family, the die-hard oldies distrust  the  up-and-coming young. ‘It wasn’t like  that in my day,’ is given  as a reason for never changing.

Queen is ‘thrilled’ at arrival of first  great-grandson

When Prince William went to university at St  Andrews, the Royal Family all knew that he was almost bound to meet a girl, form  a relationship, and fall in love.

The Queen could have put pressure on him not  to marry the woman he loved, but — ‘for the sake of the Monarchy’ — to go and  find some princess or aristocrat from the European marriage-pool, or to wait  until someone ‘suitable’ turned up.

Instead, the Queen could see that the best  hope for the future of the Crown was for Prince William to marry for love. 

And she could also see that, in the modern  world, one of the factors which would do most damage to the Monarchy was the  old, class-obsessed sense of hierarchy.

Condoned: When Prince William went to university at St Andrews, the Royal Family all knew that he was almost bound to meet a girl, form a relationship, and fall in loveCondoned: When Prince William went to university at St  Andrews, the Royal Family all knew that he was almost bound to meet a girl, form  a relationship, and fall in love

The Queen could see that the best hope for the future of the Crown was for Prince William to marry for loveThe Queen could see that the best hope for the future of  the Crown was for Prince William to marry for love

Republicans like Tony Benn have always  reiterated that the Monarchy is just the apex of a pyramid of privilege from  which ‘ordinary people’ are shut out.

The Queen’s extraordinary  triumph — and  the single  most valuable gift she bequeaths to her new great-grandchild —  is to have made those  arguments seem oddly quaint and  irrelevant.

Tony Benn, of course, belongs to the proud  old socialist tradition of Keir Hardie, a working-class Scot who’d been down the  mines before becoming Labour’s first ever MP in the 1890s.

In 1896, when the then Duchess of York  provided Queen Victoria with a great-grandchild — the future Edward VIII —  Hardie was brave enough to get up amid the jeers and boos of all the gentlemen  in Parliament and utter a strange prophecy.

‘From his childhood onward, this boy will be  surrounded by sycophants and flatterers by the score . . . a line will be drawn  between him and the people he is called upon some day to reign over,’ he  declared.

‘In due course . . . he will be sent on a  tour round the world, and probably rumours of a morganatic [to someone of a  lower station] marriage will follow, and the end of it will be the country will  be called upon to pay the bill.’

In spite of her diffidence and her innately small-c conservative nature, this is the woman who has transformed the British MonarchyIn spite of her diffidence and her innately small-c  conservative nature, this is the woman who has transformed the British  Monarchy

It was an amazing prophecy because, of  course, Edward VIII did grow up surrounded by flatterers; he did make an  unsuitable marriage; and he nearly brought the Monarchy to its knees.

When Elizabeth II came to the throne, there  were, likewise, critics who said that she was too cut off from ordinary people,  that her court was composed of ‘tweedy’ upper-class toffs, and her voice was  off-puttingly posh.

Given the fact that the Queen is who she is —  the daughter of Scottish aristocracy and a long line of European royalty — it is  not surprising that, born when she was, she should indeed be a posh lady. 

She is plainly no revolutionary. In many  respects, she is an old-fashioned person and always has been.

That was what annoyed the critics at the  beginning of her reign: she was Christian, she was dutiful, she seemed to  approve of very ungroovy things like the Commonwealth.

But in spite of her diffidence and her  innately small-c conservative nature, this is the woman who has transformed the  British Monarchy. The sheer numbers of people who celebrated the Diamond  Jubilee, in appalling weather conditions, showed how successful she has been in  transforming public perceptions of the Monarchy.

It was only in 1997 — not so very long ago —  that the Mall filled with an angry crowd, and some sections of the media were  accusing the Queen of callousness, indifference to her people, and failure to  sense the mood of a national tragedy in Diana’s death.

With hindsight, most of those who expressed  such views can probably see now that the Queen’s first priority was to be with  her grandsons in a moment of terrible grief, and to shield Harry and William as  much as possible from the painful glare of publicity.

But even in that traumatic week of their  mother’s death, the Queen did in fact demonstrate she was in control. She made a  broadcast, with the window of Buckingham Palace open, to reveal the half-angry  crowd outside. The window was a symbol of her approach. She was in fact  listening, in spite of what the critics said.

And many people watching Her Majesty give  that broadcast felt that she had in fact, for almost half a century, been  ‘there’ for her people, visiting hospitals, scenes of disaster such as Aberfan,  as well as doing her duty with the ceremonial and regimental stuff.

The Queen is plainly no revolutionary. In many respects, she is an old-fashioned person and always has beenThe Queen is plainly no revolutionary. In many respects,  she is an old-fashioned person and always has been

After the death of Lady Diana, the Queen's first priority was to be with her grandsons in a moment of terrible grief, and to shield Harry and William as much as possible from the painful glare of publicity After the death of Lady Diana, the Queen’s first  priority was to be with her grandsons in a moment of terrible grief, and to  shield Harry and William as much as possible from the painful glare of publicity

But she committed herself to revere Diana’s  memory and to learn lessons from the tragedy. Within weeks, the public began to  see a different Queen, one who realised that she need not always be hidden  behind a screen of protocol but could reveal her smiling, kindly nature when  visiting schools, factories and the like.

She was not pretending to be Diana. She  acknowledged that Diana was irreplaceable. But she became less formal, less  reserved.

Royal visits around the country do actually  cheer people up. This is patently the case. And in a society which is  increasingly seen as being fragmented and broken, the Monarchy, in the past 20  years, has been seen to be more, and not less, of a focus for unity.

The fact that the Queen’s political views  remain completely unspoken is one of the ingredients in this success story.  Although the monarch is our Head of State, she or he needs to be something which  is not political.

The Queen is a very religious woman, and  that, no doubt, is the chief source of her inner strength personally. 

When the Queen, pictured yesterday with her ladies-in-waiting, holds her great-grandson in her arms, she will know that she is handing on a Monarchy in better shape than it has ever beenWhen the Queen, pictured yesterday with her  ladies-in-waiting, holds her great-grandson in her arms, she will know that she  is handing on a Monarchy in better shape than it has ever been

The fact that the Queen's political views remain completely unspoken is one of the ingredients in this success story. Although the monarch is our Head of State, she or he needs to be something which is not politicalThe fact that the Queen’s political views remain  completely unspoken is one of the ingredients in this success story. Although  the monarch is our Head of State, she or he needs to be something which is not  political

A Queen who is so long- lived becomes  associated in the minds of her subjects with the  life-experience of her  nation. During her reign, Britain has moved through the Cold War, the industrial  unrest of the Seventies, and all the amazing technological and social changes of  the past quarter of a century.

Everything, from the way we communicate to  the sexual mores we regard as normal, seems to have altered. One fixed point has  been the Monarchy.

If it had really remained unchanging,  however, it would have cracked and become useless. It is because, under our  Queen, the Monarchy has constantly changed that it has managed to remain that  ‘fixed point’ in our firmament; just as the heavenly bodies are not really  fixed, but perpetually revolving and spinning.

At the wedding of the future George V and  Queen Mary in the Chapel Royal, St James’s, the then Archbishop of Canterbury,  E.W. Benson, said: ‘This is an age, and this is a people which, in spite of many  outward changes, still, in its heart of hearts, looks to the Family. The first  element of society is  the Family.’

He defined exactly why our Monarchy works. It  is based on an organic, living thing which we all recognise.

William and Kate's child will now have the chance to have as 'normal' a life as any royal person in historyWilliam and Kate’s child will now have the chance to  have as ‘normal’ a life as any royal person in history

During the last years of Queen Victoria’s  reign, there were more republicans in Britain than there are today.

And within 20 years of her death, many of the  monarchies of Europe (ruled over by her grandchildren in Germany and Russia, for  example) had been wiped away.

The 20th century saw some of the most inhuman  forms of government in recorded history — in the Soviet Union, in Germany, in  Italy, Communism and Fascism tried to rule by dogma, and fit human beings into  their cruel, rigid theories of what humanity should be like.

Monarchy, in contrast, was based not on a  dogma, but on a family. For this reason, it knows its worst crises when that  family breaks up — as when Edward VIII abdicated, or the present Queen’s  children had marriages which came unstuck.

William and Kate’s child will have the chance  to have as ‘normal’ a life as any royal person in history.

That is because the Queen took the bold step  of modernising the Monarchy little by little — including the vitally important  decision to abolish male primogeniture, and saying that Kate’s first child, male  or female, would be next in line to the throne after William.

When the Queen holds her great-grandson in  her arms, she will know that she is handing on a Monarchy in better shape than  it has ever been.

The writer G.K. Chesterton said that a true  democrat would be happy to choose rulers by sticking pins in a telephone  directory and taking out the names he had pricked. In some ways, this is what  Monarchy is.

The Queen is a modest person. She does not  think that the House of Windsor is the best family in Britain: it is a  representative family. Just as the Unknown Warrior in Westminster Abbey  represents all the fallen in war, so the Royal Family represents all families. 

Thousands flocked to Buckingham Palace this  week for news of the royal birth, just as millions swarmed into the Mall during  the two Royal Jubilees to thank the Queen for getting it so very right. 

The future is safe — thanks to  her.

THE POLKA DOT DRESS

Despite her ordeal, Kate looked like Snow White with lashings of Middleton  Woman eyeliner

By  Jan Moir<

She might be new to the job, but the Duchess  of Cambridge seemed to know just what was expected of her debut as a royal  mother. 

Only radiant would do, of course. Radiant,  but with a charming edge of post-labour exhaustion — and a terrific blow  dry. 

On the steps of the hospital, clutching her  newborn son, she looked as pretty as Snow White in her short, bump-exposing  polka dot blue dress. Was this frock choice a nod to history? To the similar  green polka dot frock sported by Princess Diana when she held her son on these  very same steps 31 years ago?

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She might be new to the job, but the Duchess of Cambridge seemed to know just what was expected of her debut as a royal motherShe might be new to the job, but the Duchess of  Cambridge seemed to know just what was expected of her debut as a royal  mother

Was Kate's frock choice a nod to history? To the similar green polka dot frock sported by Princess Diana when she held her son on these very same steps 31 years ago?Was Kate’s frock choice a nod to history? To the similar  green polka dot frock sported by Princess Diana when she held her son on these  very same steps 31 years ago?

If so, it was a sweetest of royal  tributes.

We now understand that the day before, Kate  had a natural birth — did that mean no eyeliner? For when it came to that  terrifying first post-birth appearance in front of the world’s media, the  Duchess stuck to her own tried and tested family traditions. 

This meant Middleton Woman eyeliner, tan  tights and that tinkling, polite voice answering all questions with the usual  winning modesty.

She speaks, she talks, but she gives nothing  important away. By her side, casually dressed William seemed understandably  tense, but joshed with reporters. He clearly wanted to get the ordeal over with  and go home to start family life away from the cameras.

Kate and William bring out baby Cambridge for  first time

There was one unexpected moment of royal  charisma from The Firm’s newest member. In Kate’s arms, the baby gurgled, then a  hand and pudgy fingers suddenly appeared above the swaddling; the first tiny  royal wave from the Prince of Cambridge.

The Duchess seemed confident and happy, even  if some mums may have thought it would have sent a better message to women if  she had staggered out for her photo-call with sweat-streaked hair in disarray,  shouting: ‘I’m never doing that again! That kid was nearly nine  pounds!’

That was never going to happen, of course.  Her frosted petal charm remained undented by the rigours of birth, while as she  flicked her glossy chocolate hair around, it was clear that it had been coiffed  to perfection. We had expected nothing less.

The Duchess seemed confident and happy, even if some mums may have thought it would have sent a better message to women if she had staggered out for her photo-call with sweat-streaked hair in disarrayThe Duchess seemed confident and happy, even if some  mums may have thought it would have sent a better message to women if she had  staggered out for her photo-call with sweat-streaked hair in disarray

There was one unexpected moment of royal charisma from The Firm's newest member. In Kate's arms, the baby gurgled, then a hand and pudgy fingers suddenly appeared above the swaddlingThere was one unexpected moment of royal charisma from  The Firm’s newest member. In Kate’s arms, the baby gurgled, then a hand and  pudgy fingers suddenly appeared above the swaddling

Earlier in the day, news crews spotted a VIP  — Kate’s hairdresser — sneaking in through a hospital side door.

‘Carrying bags of brushes and combs and who  knows what else,’ said Sky’s Paul Harrison. Buoyed by this correct  identification of the tools of the coiffeuse’s trade, he took a stab at  something much deeper; the reasons behind having a hairdo. It was, he surmised,  ‘to make the Duchess feel good and ready to face the world’s Press’.

Excellent.

Yes, day two of Royal Baby coverage continued  in the same vein as day one. Nobody knew nothing.

Yet with a full day’s programming stretching  ahead like a desert of wordless terror, the nation’s broadcasters did their  best. 

Duracell bunny screen hogger chatathon champ  Kay Burley was back at her post outside the hospital with all the big  questions.

Earlier, news crews spotted a VIP - Kate's hairdresser (right) - sneaking in through a hospital side doorEarlier, news crews spotted a VIP – Kate’s hairdresser  (right) – sneaking in through a hospital side door

Who would visit? When would we see the baby?  Were the couple staying overnight? She put them to her colleague Paul Harrison.  Tragically, he didn’t have any of the answers. ‘You’re putting me on the spot  again,’ he complained.

After a winningly understated Carole and  Michael Middleton had been and gone in their taxi, Prince Charles and the  Duchess of Cornwall were expected. Sort of. 

‘Nobody is quite sure what is going on,’ said  Simon McCoy for the BBC. ‘Here they are, in this car.’ The  car shot past with no one royal in it. Charles and Camilla got out of the next  car. ‘Simon, they looked pretty cheerful?’ said Huw Edwards from the BBC  studio. 

‘Yes, I was relieved that someone turned up,’  he cried.

Anything else happening down there? ‘Cars are  just parking in their right places.’

Huw then announced that: ‘We’re going to talk  a little bit about security, because that is a prime concern for the Royal  Family.’

Both Kate and William looked in good spirits as they spoke to the waiting press after they emerged from the Lindo Wing of St Mary's Hospital in LondonBoth Kate and William looked in good spirits as they  spoke to the waiting press after they emerged from the Lindo Wing of St Mary’s  Hospital in London

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Everyone groaned and switched over to Sky,  where yet more interviews were taking place with members of the public. Or, to  put it another way, the usual collection of folks who scream and waggle their  tongues whenever Kay Burley tells them: ‘You are live on Sky News.’

And what about the baby’s name? No one had a  clue. Joanna Gosling, at the Palace for the BBC, said: ‘It is not clear if they  have not decided if they are revealing it to the wider world. We might find out  today, we might have to wait a bit longer.’ Thanks for that.

In the meantime, everyone had to call the new  prince something. Sadly, it was usually something glutinous. Australian Prime  Minister Kevin Rudd opted for ‘the royal bub’. Jeremy Thompson on Sky News tried  the avuncular ‘this little lad’. Jane Hill for the BBC: ‘That little baby going  home.’ Someone else on the BBC ‘the little scrap that they are bringing with  them’.

While we waited for the first glimpse of the  new prince, the BBC wanted to know if anyone around here knew what a royal baby  even looked like. Royal photographer Ian Pelham Turner knew what we could  expect.

‘Normally it is a peek-a-boo glance. It will  be wrapped up well,’ he said. ‘Babies have to grow into their looks,’ he added.  Baby Cambridge, take note.

Gifts galore but they don’t want  them

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge yesterday  thanked the world for the gifts they had received following the birth of their  son.

But William and Kate have  suggested  that instead of sending presents, well-wishers could express their support by  donating to charity as a way of marking the birth of Britain’s future  King.

A statement on the Palace website said that  in order to ‘harness this extraordinary generosity of spirit’, people could  perhaps help  their local children’s charities.

It was also suggested that they could donate  to the Imperial College Healthcare Charity — the charity at the hospital where  the Prince of Cambridge was born — as this will help women, newborn babies and  young families.

The statement said: ‘The Duke and Duchess of  Cambridge are incredibly grateful for the support and goodwill being expressed  at this happy time.

‘Their Royal Highnesses are grateful, too,  for the many gifts they have already received.

‘To harness this extraordinary generosity of  spirit, they suggest people might at this time look to support those more in  need; perhaps a children’s charity local to them, as a way of marking the birth  of their child.’